Author: Wells Family Law

Five Things To Consider Before You Decide To Keep The Marital Home

Five Things To Consider Before You Decide To Keep The Marital Home

In the vast majority of the cases we see involving children, at least one party wants to keep the marital home. After all, the family home often carries significant emotional ties and memories. It is also a place of comfort for most children. But doing so might not be as easy as you think, or the most practical decision. With that in mind, here are five things to consider when deciding whether to try to keep the marital home in your divorce. In dividing the marital estate, the goal is to fairly divide your assets and debts. Generally, this means that both you and your spouse should be walking away from the marriage with approximately 50% of the total marital estate. If you have multiple…

Collaborative v. Traditional: What Type of Divorce is Best?
|

Collaborative v. Traditional: What Type of Divorce is Best?

For those considering engaging in a Collaborative divorce instead of pursing the traditional, litigation-style divorce, there are several differences you should be aware of. The Collaborative divorce model acknowledges that not every divorcing couple wishes to inflict as much damage as they can in a litigated process. Below are eight key differences between Collaborative and traditional divorces:  Not every case is right for the Collaborative process. In some cases, a party will need to have the court involved early to ensure full disclosure of financial information. In other cases, the Collaborative process may be a more expensive option than a traditional divorce. However, Collaborative divorce is an excellent option for families wishing to avoid the collateral damage of traditional divorce. Example of cases where Collaborative…

Making Wishes Come True in The 2023 Denver Halloween Parade

Making Wishes Come True in The 2023 Denver Halloween Parade

Wells Family Law’s float – Aladdin’s Lamp, Making Wishes Come True – was entered in the Broadway Merchants Association and City Council Lucky District 7’s seventh annual Broadway Halloween Parade last Saturday. Wells Family Law along with family and friends dressed as the Genie, Aladdin, Jasmin, Abu, Rajah and Jafar, among others, accompanied the float on the parade route. The parade kicks off a series of family-friendly events leading up to Halloween in the city. Wells Family Law is committed to helping families through collaboration, mediation and litigation. For more details click here

6 Tips To Avoid An Expensive Divorce

6 Tips To Avoid An Expensive Divorce

I get it, divorce is expensive. The higher the conflict, the higher the fees. So, with this in mind, here are some tips to keep costs as low as possible during your divorce. 1. If you and your soon to be ex-spouse are on amicable terms, don’t have parenting disputes and do not have complex financial issues, it might be worth trying to figure things out between the two of you rather than hiring attorneys. There are forms and instructions available at www.courts.state.co.us/forms. You will still have to pay court filing fees and the like, but if you are successful resolving your issues without having to engage attorneys, it will be significantly less expensive than the alternative. 2. Be thorough when choosing your attorney. Depending…

Traveling with Children After Divorce

Traveling with Children After Divorce

So, you are getting divorced, or you’ve already received your Decree, and you want to take your kids on a trip? Regardless of whether you are in the process, or have already received your final Decree, traveling with children will be somewhat different than it was before the divorce started. For example, once the divorce or legal separation action is commenced in Colorado, you and your spouse are both subject to a rule known as the “Automatic Temporary Injunction,” which, among other things, prohibits either of you from taking the children out of state without the permission of the other parent. In addition, once the divorce starts, you should be communicating about any overnights the children will spend away from home during your parenting time….

The Ups and Downs of Dividing Airline and Hotel Points in a Divorce

The Ups and Downs of Dividing Airline and Hotel Points in a Divorce

I get it. Your spouse is a workaholic who has travelled for work throughout your marriage while you stayed home to raise the kids. It can be galling. Especially if their absence has contributed to the demise of your relationship. That said, there is a silver lining to all that travel now that your marriage is wrapping up. Many people who travel for work are able to accumulate substantial airline and hotel points, even when their employer reimburses them for their travel costs. In addition, some employers permit employees to keep the miles they accrue on corporate credit cards. Airline and hotel points, as well as credit card and loyalty award points acquired during the marriage, are marital property divisible in divorce in Colorado. Depending…

Four Things to Consider if You’re a “Disneyland Parent.”

Four Things to Consider if You’re a “Disneyland Parent.”

Who doesn’t love a good trip to the Magic Kingdom? It is, after all, the happiest place on Earth. So, why has the phrase “Disneyland Dad” come to be so derogatory, and what can be done about it? A Disneyland parent is the parent who does not have primary custody of the children after a divorce and who, in the limited time they have with the children, attempts to make up for their lack of involvement by indulging their children’s whims, giving them gifts, taking them on special excursions, and generally avoiding anything – including imposing limits or discipline – that could make their child unhappy. This strategy has the effect, whether intended or not, of painting the other parent as the “mean” parent by contrast. In…

Wells Family Law Attorneys Recognized as “Women to Watch” by ColoradoBiz Magazine

Wells Family Law Attorneys Recognized as “Women to Watch” by ColoradoBiz Magazine

The attorneys at Wells Family Law are honored to be among the successful and influential women recognized by ColoradoBiz Magazine as Women to Watch this summer. Wells Family Law supports and empowers women in the legal profession. With an award-winning team of attorneys, Wells Family Law, PC, is focused on helping families navigate the challenges of changing relationships. From dividing stock options in divorce, to valuing and allocating closely held businesses, to analyzing trust interests, to litigating parental disputes, the women of Wells Family Law are experienced in providing practical solutions to complex domestic relations issues through advocacy, negotiation, collaboration and litigation.

Wells Family Law Announces Official Firm Mascot

Wells Family Law Announces Official Firm Mascot

For those of our clients and vendors who have been in the office over the past year, you may already be acquainted with Wells Family Law’s official mascot: Finn Clemmer. Finn is an extraordinary member of the Wells Family Law team. At the risk of anthropomorphizing, Finn politely greets clients at the door, escorts them in, and occasionally checks back to ensure everyone is comfortable and all their needs are met. While Finn does not hold any official degrees or certifications, he is a natural emotional support dog. With his empathic demeanor, fluffy fur and soulful eyes, Finn promotes a sense of joy in the office. In his spare time, Finn prefers walks with Julie, snacks, and napping. He also plays well with others. Please…

The Real Estate Divorce – What You Need to Know

The Real Estate Divorce – What You Need to Know

By Kristi Anderson Wells, Esq. Unique issues arise in divorce when income-producing real estate constitutes a portion of the marital estate. We often see cases where the value in the marital estate is held in companies that own real estate, sometimes in a single real estate holding company, sometimes held in a series of entities with different investors in each entity. Sometimes the entities contain development projects that are in progress, sometimes they own existing office buildings, residential long or short-term rentals, retail strip malls or warehouses, and in some cases apartment buildings. In one divorce during the last downturn, the marital estate was made up almost entirely of hundreds of millions of dollars of “broken” condominium projects which the real estate investor had acquired…